by Jean-Louis Gassée
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Well, not everyone, we have our contingent of Republican believers who still think Obama is a socialist.
Which reminds me of the way we, the French and the Americans, are on occasion equally knee-jerk bone-headed.  In my country of birth, painful reforms are tarred as “libéral”.  There, the label means right wing free-market ultra-conservative.  Here, in my adopted country, painful reforms are called “liberal”, meaning left wing, bleeding heart, big government tax and spend socialist.  Logomachy.  Why think when you can maim an idea with a label?
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We’ll see a lot more of that in the two months remaining before the November 4th vote, one many of us here think it will go Obama’s way.  Why?
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In the first place, we despise the Bush administration. Never in the Valley’s history have we seen an administration so anti-scientific, anti-liberties, xenophobic, intrusive, profligate, dishonest, harmful to America’s standing in the world and in many ways an obstacle to what we do, a counter-example of what we stand for.
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Yes, we’re capitalists, we like to make money. But, with few unfortunate exceptions, we do it because we help entrepreneurs realize their dreams, because we’re behind Google, Cisco, Yahoo!, Apple, Jupiter, BEA, Facebook and many, many others.  We don’t strip people from their home ownership with trick subprime loans, throwing the country’s financial system into a spin it hasn’t yet recovered from.  Yes, there was the Internet Bubble and, like the current crisis, it was aided and abetted by Wall Street con artists while Washington looked the other way, or took from the other hand.  To do what we do, to continue helping innovative companies start and grow, we need a stable financial system, not the biggest deficit this country ever dug itself in.
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This administration condones the re-invasion of religion into public education: some schools in the South now teach creationism, holding the Bible’s account as a factual description of the beginnings of the Universe.  Not poetry, symbolism or a meditation on the mystery of our origins, no, fact.  The same intellectual honesty presides over discussions of climate change.
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Here, we live in a nice oasis: the color of your passport, of your skin, the thickness of your accent, the way you pray or roll in the hay, none of that matters.  What can you do?  How can you help?  Those are the questions we ask.  As a result, entrepreneurs love to come here from all over the world, Russian programmers, Chinese Ph. D, even French Polytechniciens.  I remember the July 2001 day when I became a US citizen.  There were 996 of us in the San Jose Civic Auditorium.  The federal judge who administered the swearing in told us there were 80 nations in the room.  Tiny Chinese grandmothers, Hispanics, Slavs, Swedes, Indians, Iranians…  And, with tears in my eyes, tears that come back as I write this, I thought: This is how my dear Silicon Valley will continue to be this oasis of meritocracy and entrepreneurship.  The same judge kept telling us to use our new civic rights, to register to vote.  The ceremony came to an end and, as we exited the auditorium, we saw a big table and volunteers ready to help with the registration paperwork – for the Republican Party.  The Democrats were at the beach.  That’s how I became a registered Republican –  soon to re-register as an Independent and thus able to vote either way.
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Back to the Bush administration, what does it do to help Silicon Valley continue to attract entrepreneurs from all over the world? Getting work visas becomes much harder.  This in a country where 25% of high-school “students” quit before graduation, when graduating is so easy all you have to do, in some of the worse schools, is fog the proverbial mirror.  In all fairness, that very problem, the state of high school education, the resulting lack of qualified “intellectual manpower”, pardon the oxymoron, and the ensuing need to import it, that situation is not Bush’s fault.  We blame his cavalier indifference to it.  But it predated him and secondary schools are but an example of a more general case of systems so entrenched, so powerful they can’t be reformed with politics as usual.
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Let’s face it, it’s our problem.  We keep electing solons who, once in Washington, run into the arms and wallets of lobbyists and sell us down the river to telecom, Big Pharma, healthcare and Wall Street interests.  The executive, Bush, McCain or Obama can’t win against Congress and lobbyists.
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Unless…
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Obama, once elected, displays the charisma and willpower to connect with the electorate over the heads of Congress. In other words, we need a President who gets our support, channels our willpower.  Then, together, we put legislators into a vise and squeeze them into working for us instead of being on the payroll of lobbyists and their clients.
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In his column, Frédéric explains how Obama used the lessons and the people from Howard Dean’s successful Internet operation.  Obama has shown the will and skill to use technology to empower voters like no one before him.  That’s how he won against the “inevitable” Hillary.  Too bad for her supporters if they stay angry at Obama for beating their champion, they should be furious at her for her entitled behavior and for not paying attention to what the “inexperienced” competitor was building.
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This is dangerous, of course.  Political scientists will rightly remind us of the dangers of direct democracy. It can lead to dictatorship, to a rump parliament, to the disappearance of checks and balances.  But this is a democratic 50-50 country and I don’t see a dictatorship happening here.  Unless, of course, we look at the Stalinist labeling of human beings as “enemy combatants” in order to torture them, to deprive them from the right to habeas corpus and to a fair trial.  A French communist once lectured me on the constitution of the Soviet Union, it guaranteed civil rights, personal liberties.  Unless, of course, you were an “Enemy of the People”.  No rights for you, then.  Off to the gulag.
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With this in mind, for many of us here, Obama looks safer than playing the same Washington game with barely different players. We could be naïve, we know there is the “small matter of implementation”, of the ugly reality of governing once you’ve won the contest.  Still, we hope this mestizo of John Kennedy and Martin Luther King (minus the women and the pharmacy) will restore faith in our government. — JLG

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