So says Richard Stallman the father of the Free Software Foundation. He makes a simple argument: By using Cloud Computing applications you surrender your life (data) to some big company you can’t trust.  You’re no longer in control.  Conversely, if you keep everything on your (Linux) desktop, you’re the master of your own destiny.
.

This is, to say the least, countercultural. The new and improved wisdom is “everything”, every application, every service will be delivered from the Cloud, a “server farm” somewhere in the world.  To be a little more precise, yesterday’s difference between the e-mail client application and the e-mail service is going away.  The browser becomes your OS (Operating System) through which the e-mail service (Gmail or Outlook Web Access) is delivered.  Even Photoshop will go this way: you store the original image in the Cloud and, through your browser, you navigate the universe of editing features.  You give an order, say crop a part of the picture, Gaussian blur, twist a color.  Then, the order is executed on the server, in the Cloud.  This uses much faster computers than your laptop and your browser gets the rendered result.
.
This is exactly what Photoshop Express does. The old way local processed the image locally because you couldn’t count on the network bandwidth (speed) to ship back an updated image from the server each time you made a modification.  The local processor had fast access to local memory, performed the image rotation and the screen had similar fast access to the modified image residing in memory.  The ‘everything local’ (storage, processor, display) advantage hasn’t disappeared, but networks are faster, servers have more muscle (in most cases) than my laptop and we use smarter ways to pick which part of the image we want to send from the server to the browser.  Put another way, Photoshop in the Cloud isn’t a universal solution: graphics professionals will want a 30”screen, eight processors and 16 gigabytes of local storage.  But ‘the rest of us’ will find the Cloud solution satisfactory, especially if we can walk to any computer in the world, upload, edit and e-mail polished pictures without a local application, using Photoshop (or its competitors) as a service, not a desktop application.
.
This is both an actual example and a valid metaphor for the new genre of application software delivered as a service (SaaS) from enterprise servers or from a Cloud Computing provider such as Google or Microsoft Live. Stallman will have none of this.  Interviewed by The Guardian, he counters: “It’s just as bad as using a proprietary program. Do your own computing on your own computer with your copy of a freedom-respecting program. If you use a proprietary program or somebody else’s web server, you’re defenseless. You’re putty in the hands of whoever developed that software.”
.
The gentleman is opinionated, to say the least. A Google search on his name will produce a rich trove of strongly worded rants revolving around one idea: software ought to be free.  This hasn’t made him friends in companies such as Microsoft but Linux and its cousin FreeBSD, all related to AT&T’s Unix, have become indispensable components of modern computing.  Richard Stallman knows very well that, without the free software movement, there would be no Cloud Computing.  Amazon, Yahoo!, Google and most others run on free Unix relatives.
.
Going back to the argument Stallman just made against Cloud Computing, it’s hard not to find parts of his statement either naïve or disingenuous. If you use proprietary software, he says, “You’re putty in the hands of whoever developed that software.”  The idea is that free, Open Source software, protects people against dirty deeds, manipulations from the authors of proprietary software.  Sounds ominous but, regrettably, Stallman forgets to offer examples of such bad actions.  Higher price, perhaps?  But the cost of ownership, that is training, maintenance and the like, dwarfs the initial price tag of software, be it on the desktop or on servers. Unlike an extraordinarily gifted programmer such as Stallman, most users cannot inspect the source code of their word processor or e-mail program.  As a result, the ‘protection’ afforded by ‘freedom-respecting’ programs isn’t as good for me as it is for him.
.
There is more.  We no longer live in a disconnected computing world: we get e-mail, we look up Richard Stallman on Wikipedia. So, even if we sagely run spreadsheets or photo-editing programs on our desktops (the Cloud Computing giant Google offers a neat desktop Picasa 3 on Linux…), we have to communicate and we have no way to inspect the software that runs on the network.  Like it or not, we have no choice, we trust others with our data.  Bad things happen from time to time, but not to the point of killing the system.  Cloud Computing may or may not be The Future but doing everything on the desktop is definitely passé.
.
Richard Stallman forgets a statistical truth: Trusting people get screwed sometimes.  Paranoid people get screwed all the time. –JLG
.

Print Friendly
Be Sociable, Share!