Something to keep our mind off the Wall Street catastrophe. Who knows, we might be on the verge of a “nuclear winter” as the Bush administration wakes up to another consequence of its intellectual shallowness, of its inability to understand that for markets to be really free they need to be regulated with an effective, uncorrupted police to enforce regulations.
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So, turning to saner pursuits, this coming Tuesday September 23rd, T-Mobile is slated to announce their first Android phone. What does this mean, how will this impact the smartphone market and the cellular carriers?
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Android is the name of the Open Source smartphone OS developed by Google’s engineers. What we think T-Mobile will introduce is a set built by HTC, running the Android OS and applications.  In advance of the launch, T-Mobile appears to be upgrading its network, or parts of it, to 3G connectivity.  In addition, T-Mobile plans an on-line store for Android applications, the rumor being it won’t impose the kind of restrictions Apple is known for.  In other words, T-Mobile welcomes Android developers with open arms.  Predictably, prices, handset and service, will be iPhone-like.  What appears to be not at all iPhone-like is a slide-out keyboard to be used with the screen in landscape mode.
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If all of the above is close enough to the upcoming facts, this will add a considerable amount of energy to the already lively smartphone market. Many, yours truly included, are happy to see more competition for the iPhone and his imperious maker.  As I was documenting my iPhone’s numerous crashes, one Apple individual expressed happiness: There was only one “real” OS crash, you see, the rest being processed “killed because they started to use up too much memory.” It’s a relief to know my rudely interrupted Safari browser connections or Maps searches are not real crashes.
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But, more competition is a vague phrase. Nokia has been around a long time, Windows Mobile is about 10 years old, RIM (Blackberry) too, to say nothing of Palm, Sony Ericsson and Motorola.  The iPhone has had competition for more than a year, what changes now?
Not the operator situation.  T-Mobile is a good company, with good customer service, they’re part of the big Deutsche Telekom konzern, arguably smaller but more solid than Sprint.  Curiously, neither Verizon nor AT&T, nor Sprint appear to be interested in Android.  Is it because they fear Google will have too much power on them because of the openness of the platform, because it could lead to Android VoIP applications bypassing their network billing system?  T-Mobile, in a challenger position, has no such fear.  On Blackberries, they offer what is known as WiFi Mobile Calling, that is VoIP over WiFi at home or at the office.  In other words, carriers don’t like Google pushing them towards their pre-ordained destiny: becoming wireless ISP.  Verizon talks the Open (that word again) Network talk but doesn’t really walk the walk, that is allowing anyone to bring their handset to their network.  They and Motorola got sued, and had to settle, for removing Bluetooth features allowing too much data exchange between a laptop and a phone.  Such exchange was bad: it reduced billable network traffic.  A bigger threat to the iPhone would be Verizon embracing the Android platform.
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What about the product itself?  I’ll get one as soon as possible, I already have a T-Mobile subscription. I suspect the keyboard-based UI will be well received and I’m sure we’ll see good applications on the handset, if only native Google apps, games and utilities.  The technophile is excited, and so is the venture capitalist as Android will help more applications developers make more money, resulting in new opportunities to finance interesting companies.
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And there is Google. Not the Android team, some members are ex-accomplices of mine, I admire what they do, but Google the search and advertising and Cloud Computing company.  Will Google help the still very timid smartphone advertising market?  Will a better keyboard enable more mobile applications?  For example, even as a long-time Blackberry user, I would not write this column on it.  And I won’t do it on my iPhone either.  But, will I use Google Docs on the T-Mobile handset because of its (rumored) horizontal keyboard?
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Moving to content, will the T-Mobile Android phone run all YouTube videos, will it run a version of Flash?  The iPhone doesn’t, a topic of muddled technical and industry politics debate, Apple and Adobe aren’t working too well together of late.
Still on content, imagine this: Google makes a deal with Amazon and all the Kindle content becomes available on Android phones.  Or, not at first but in a future iteration, the video downloads Amazon sells become available on Android.  And why not start sooner with the music (MP3) files Amazon sells.
You see why I’m curious.  I’m lucky, the T-Mobile office in Palo Alto is about 100 yards away from my office.  --JLG
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