While still a teenager, my youngest daughter was determined to take on the role of used car salesperson when we sold our old Chevy Tahoe. Her approach was impeccable: Before letting the prospective buyer so much as touch the car, she gave him a tour of its defects, the dent in the rear left fender, the slight tear in the passenger seat, the fussy rear window control. Only then did she lift the hood to reveal the pristine engine bay. She knew the old rule: Don't let the customer discover the defects.

Pointing out the limitations of your product is a sign of strength, not weakness. I can't fathom why Apple execs keep ignoring this simple prescription for a healthy relationship with their customers. Instead, we get tiresome boasting: …Apple designs Macs, the best personal computers in the worldwe [make] the best products on earth. This self-promotion violates another rule: Don't go around telling everyone how good you are in the, uhm...kitchen; let those who have experienced your cookmanship do the bragging for you.

The ridicule that Apple has suffered following the introduction of the Maps application in iOS 6 is largely self-inflicted. The demo was flawless, 2D and 3D maps, turn-by-turn navigation, spectacular flyovers...but not a word from the stage about the app's limitations, no self-deprecating wink, no admission that iOS Maps is an infant that needs to learn to crawl before walking, running, and ultimately lapping the frontrunner, Google Maps. Instead, we're told that Apple's Maps may be  "the most beautiful, powerful mapping service ever."

After the polished demo, the released product gets a good drubbing: the Falkland Islands are stripped of roads and towns, bridges and façades are bizarrely rendered, an imaginary airport is discovered in a field near Dublin.

Pageview-driven commenters do the expected. After having slammed the "boring" iPhone 5, they reversed course when preorders exceed previous records, and now they reverse course again when Maps shows a few warts.

Even Joe Nocera, an illustrious NYT writer, joins the chorus with a piece titled Has Apple Peaked? Note the question mark, a tired churnalistic device, the author hedging his bet in case the peak is higher still, lost in the clouds. The piece is worth reading for its clichés, hyperbole, and statements of the obvious: "unmitigated disaster", "the canary in the coal mine", and "Jobs isn't there anymore", tropes that appear in many Maps reviews.

(The implication that Jobs would have squelched Maps is misguided. I greatly miss Dear Leader but my admiration for his unsurpassed successes doesn't obscure my recollection of his mistakes. The Cube, antennagate, Exchange For The Rest of Us [a.k.a MobileMe], the capricious skeuomorphic shelves and leather stitches… Both Siri -- still far from reliable -- and Maps were decisions Jobs made or endorsed.)

The hue and cry moved me to give iOS 6 Maps a try. Mercifully, my iPad updated by itself (or very nearly so) while I was busy untangling family affairs in Palma de Mallorca. A break in the action, I opened the Maps app and found old searches already in memory. The area around my Palma hotel was clean and detailed:



Similarly for my old Paris haunts:



The directions for my trip from the D10 Conference to my home in Palo Alto were accurate, and offered a choice of routes:



Yes, there are flaws. Deep inside rural France, iOS Maps is clearly lacking. Here's Apple's impression of the countryside:



...and Google's:



Still, the problems didn't seem that bad. Of course, the old YMMV saying applies: Your experience might be much worse than mine.

Re-reading Joe Nocera's piece, I get the impression that he hasn't actually tried Maps himself. Nor does he point out that you can still use Google Maps on an iPhone or iPad:



The process is dead-simple: Add maps.google.com as a Web App on your Home Screen and voilà, Google Maps without waiting for Google to come up with a native iOS app, or for Apple to approve it. Or you can try other mapping apps such as Navigon. Actually, I'm surprised to see so few people rejoice at the prospect of a challenger to Google's de facto maps monopoly.

Not all bloggers have fallen for the "disaster" hysteria. In this Counternotions blog post,"Kontra", who is also a learned and sardonic Twitterer, sees a measure of common sense and strategy on Apple's part:

Q: Then why did Apple kick Google Maps off the iOS platform? Wouldn't Apple have been better off offering Google Maps even while it was building its own map app? Shouldn't Apple have waited?


A: Waited for what? For Google to strengthen its chokehold on a key iOS service? Apple has recognized the significance of mobile mapping and acquired several mapping companies, IP assets and talent in the last few years. Mapping is indeed one of the hardest of mobile services, involving physical terrestrial and aerial surveying, data acquisition, correction, tile making and layer upon layer of contextual info married to underlying data, all optimized to serve often under trying network conditions. Unfortunately, like dialect recognition or speech synthesis (think Siri), mapping is one of those technologies that can't be fully incubated in a lab for a few years and unleashed on several hundred million users in more than a 100 countries in a "mature" state. Thousands of reports from individuals around the world, for example, have helped Google correct countless mapping failures over the last half decade. Without this public exposure and help in the field, a mobile mapping solution like Apple's stands no chance.


And he makes a swipe at the handwringers:


Q: Does Apple have nothing but contempt for its users?


A: Yes, Apple's evil. When Apple barred Flash from iOS, Flash was the best and only way to play .swf files. Apple's video alternative, H.264, wasn't nearly as widely used. Thus Apple's solution was "inferior" and appeared to be against its own users' interests. Sheer corporate greed! Trillion words have been written about just how misguided Apple was in denying its users the glory of Flash on iOS. Well, Flash is now dead on mobile. And yet the Earth's obliquity of the ecliptic is still about 23.4°. We seemed to have survived that one.


For Apple, Maps is a strategic move. The Cupertino company doesn't want to depend on a competitor for something as important as maps. The road (pardon the pun) will be long and tortuous, and it's unfortunate that Apple has made the chase that much harder by failing to modulate its self-praise. but think of the number of times the company has been told You Have No Right To Do This...think smartphones, stores, processors, refusing to depend on Adobe's Flash…

(As I finished writing this note, I found out Philip Ellmer-DeWitt also takes issue with Joe Nocera's position and bromides in his Apple 2.0 post. And Brian Hall, in his trademark colorful style, also strongly disagrees with the NYT writer.)

Let's just hope a fully mature Maps won't take as long as it took to transform MobileMe into iCloud.

-- JLG@mondaynote.com

 

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