by Frederic Filloux

Suddenly, everybody talks about Circa, a simple application that delivers news in an astutely condensed format. Is there a Circa secret sauce? And can it last? 

Circa's concept is simple. It's an iPhone-only app, meaning it doesn't offer an iPad variant. Circa delivers content in the most digestible of ways, for people on the move, eager to quickly drill down to the essence of news. Period. No animation, no frills, but a clever sequential construction. Here is an example from this weekend's stream: Google's announcement that, in order to avoid fines in Germany, its News service will only index sources that have decided to explicitly opt-in to being shown in G-News Germany. Here is how it looks on Circa:

Scroll #1 : the nutshell

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Scroll #2 & 3 : a short development and main quotes

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Scroll 4 & 5, the end of the development and related stories

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Now, tap the "i" icon to get source information (in green):

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Of course, sources -- "Citations" in Circa's parlance -- are clickable and send the reader to the original article displayed by a browser embedded in the application (a web-view). In doing so, Circa's editors are able to keep the story in the most compact format possible. Instead of the classical story construction taught at journalism schools that results in endless scrolling, Circa's pieces require no more than 6 or 7 screens.

In last week's presentation in Paris at the Global Editors Network Conference, David Cohn, co-founder and editor-in-chief of Circa, provided a comparison between an AP story, viewed traditionally (left) and through Circa's lenses (right, click to enlarge) :

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"At Circa, we atomize, not summarize", says Cohn. "Atomization is when a story gets broken into into its core elements: facts, stats, quotes, media [images, maps, etc.]". Pretty efficient indeed. If the reader wants to check the origin of a piece of information, s/he'll unfold the sources' deep links. Because, of course, Circa's is an aggregator in its purest form: No original reporting whatsoever, just clever repackaging.

When I challenged David Cohn about this very point, he countered that Circa's stories always have multiple sources and that he and his staff added "a high touch of editorial at every step of the process", including "serious [web based] fact-checking". He continued: "In many ways we are at the same level as other news organizations". He meant relying on third party sources or press releases from various entities... That's not exactly a consolation to me... At some point, the aggregation ecosystem might simply run out of original news to feed -- or prey -- on.

With its staff of 14 -- including five people on the West coast, four on the East coast, one in Beirut and another in Beijing -- Circa produces 40 to 60 news stories every day and, more importantly, 70 to 90 updates. Because, aside of its truncating obsession, Circa's most appreciated feature is the way it follows a story.  'Traditional media always feel the need  to recall all the background of a given story', adds David Cohn. 'At Circa, when a reader wants to follow a story he will be served with update notifications each time he reconnects to the app. See this abstract from David's presentation:

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OK, but what about the revenue side? Circa was launched last October and, as expected, has no plan to yield a single dime before next year. For now, the founders are building their audience base as fast as they can. After the iPhone app, an Android version is scheduled for the Fall, as well as a first redesign that will further simplify its user interface. After that, Circa's team sees several possibilities. The most obvious is advertising, although David Cohn acknowledges that a poor implementation could swiftly kill the app. A flurry of banners, or intrusive formats such as interstitials would irremediably sully the neat user experience. (I'm still astonished to see how slow traditional media are to leave these old formats behind while native internet projects abandon exhausted advertising apparatus much more quickly...) Circa will rather rely on native ads (see a previous Monday Note on the subject) that blend in the flow of stories, like in Forbes or Atlantic Media's business site Quartz.

Another natural way to monetize Circa would be a business-to-business iteration of the app. Many companies might be willing to support a lightweight application focusing on their sector, with features encouraging adoption and stickiness within large corporate staffs.

What about a paid-for apps? After all, Circa could be close to a million users by year-end. "We might go for an In-App purchase instead, maybe for niche segments", says David Cohn. The financial sector looks like a natural candidate. Cohn also notes, in passing, that the rigorous formatting of stories could lead to a well-structured corpus of news, ideally suited for all sorts of data-mining in the future.

Circa is in many ways a contemporary product. First, it neatly addresses the attention span challenge. Remember: it's 9 seconds for a goldfish, 8 seconds for a human in 2012 -- vs. 12 seconds in 2000 --  and let's not forget that, according to Statistic Brain, 17% of web pages are viewed for less than 4 seconds. Seriously, Circa found ways to save our precious time. Second, its content is more than neutral, it's sanitized, deodorized. It's a perfect fit for a generation of readers for whom facts are free and abundant, opinions are suspect and long form stories a relic of the past...

-- frederic.filloux@mondaynote.com

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