About Frédéric Filloux

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News Media Revenue Matrix: The Bird’s Eye View

 

Publishers struggle with newer and more complex business models. Some appear stronger than others but, above all, a broad palette is a must. It is a means to capture emerging opportunities and to compensate for the drying up of older revenue sources.

Today, I submit the following revenue matrix for a modern, content-rich news outlet. As I see it, in the news business “modernity” mean this:

A proven ability to produce original content in abundance and under multiple forms: news reporting, investigation, analysis, data journalism, long form (for ebook publishing), enterprise-like journalism, live feeds; all of the above in the form of text, images, graphics and videos.

A cultural mindset to produce contents for the platform with the best fit: a news story for a newspaper, an interactive piece on the web, live coverage for mobile. The collective publishing mindset should no longer allow first- and second-class news products. Every piece of newsroom output must be designed as a contribution to a cascading revenue system in which each element empowers every other one.

– A newsroom equipped with the best tools money can buy or — even better — build. These include a powerful Content Management System (CMS) aimed at dispatching production to every platform. The CMS must be connected to a semantic analysis system that makes all pieces of information — from a feature story to the transcript of a video — compatible with the semantic web’s standardized grammar. In order to extract more value from a piece of content, the CMS must also connect to multiple databases. For example, the name of an obscure city must be able to generate a map – through the Geonames base; a Board Director must be tied to a high value database of business leaders such as The Official Board; the name of a company must lead to open-source corporations listings.

Mastering the semantic web is indissociable from acquiring information gathering capabilities such as aggregation and filtering (see a previous Monday Note: Building a business news aggrefilter ). Such feature is a prerequisite to building high-margin products as well as exploiting the social media echo chamber. After collecting contents through RSS feeds, the combination of semantic news analysis matched against the taxonomy of, say, Twitter, will yield a trove of information on what audiences like or dislike — not only for a news media but also for its competitors. It is a complex and expensive endeavor but, in the long run, it will be worth every penny.

– And more importantly, a global editorial thinking. Too often, newsroom management suffers form what l’ll call “mono-product bias”, focusing on what is seen as noble — namely print. At a very minimum, modern editorship must embrace a widespread digital strategy. But it also must envision a sustainable game plan for a complete lineup of ancillary products that also deserve editorial coherence and strength.

Having said that, let’s have a look at the following matrix. No rocket science here, I simply made a list of 14 products that many news outlets already operate. I then tried to assess the outlook for each revenue stream. (My original idea was to assign a estimated ARPU for each cell, but there are too many parameters to be taken into account).
Click to enlarge the table:

310 table revenue

Now, let’s focus on specific products and revenue streams.

Daily Print Edition. I’m very bearish on print. Granted, it still brings the most substantial chunk of revenue – but also most of the losses. And prospects are bleak: copy sales, subscriptions, even ad sales deteriorate fast. Some light can come from ads – when they are components of customized campaigns. Daily newspapers need to be vastly simplified in order to free up resources for the wide array of other revenue streams — especially digital. I’m a big supporter of Financial Times’ Lionel Barber “Memo on reshaping the newspaper for digital age“.

Weekend editions will do better than dailies for several reasons. First, their function — long formats, portfolios, reading habits — makes them better armed against the digital tsunami that devoured news. Second, they remain a great vector for pricey advertising: on some anglo-saxon markets, weekend editions accounts for half of the print ad revenue. The New York Times understood that well as its full digital access + weekend edition bundle is a hit among customers.

Advertising revenue stream. Let’s face it, traditional ads ormats, print or digital, are dying. The conjunction of programmatic buying and ad saturation/tracking/targeting will seal their fate for good. The best outlook seems to be for customized operations and brand contents (or combinations of the two). They can spread on every platforms, including on mobile where, so far, users massively reject ads. In addition, these customized operations carry high value (huge CPMs or hefty flat fees.)

Event & Conferences. The segment is crowded and success depends on a subtile combination of attendance fees vs sponsorship, but also of editorial content. A conference is indeed a full editorial vector that needs to be treated with the same care as any other publication, i.e, with a precise angle, great casting and first class moderation that favors intellectual density over speakers flogging cheap sales pitches. News media are well positioned to deploy an efficient promotion for a content-rich, sustainable, conference system.

Intelligence & Surveys. Attractive as they might sound, these products require a great deal of expertise to make a difference. Very few media can fulfill the promise and justify the high price that goes along with such offerings.

Training and MOOCs represent an interesting potential diversification for some business publications. They carry several advantages: by addressing a young readership, MOOCs can create an early attachment to the brand; the level of risk is low as long as the media company limits itself to being a distributor (quality MOOCs production is very expensive). For a business publication, such activities represent a great way to increase its penetration in the corporate world where the need for training is limitless.

Premium Subscriptions. Some large, diversified media companies are already considering complex subscription packages for a small number of high-yield clients. In addition to print and full digital access, such packages could include access to conferences & events, MOOCs, market intelligence, and other publications. Testing the concept is a low-risk proposition.

The Business to Business segment remains the province of specialized publications. But the potential is there for general-audience media: corporations are hungry for information. The era of the bulky corporate intranet that no one watches is gone; today, for their staff, companies want apps for mobile and tablets that will save time while being precisely targeted and well-designed. Not an easy market – but  a very solvent one.

Sketchy and questionable as it is, the above matrix also illustrates the complexity of designing and selling such a wide range of products to individuals or corporations. Only a small number of news organizations will have the staff, skills and resolve to address such a broad range of opportunities.

frederic.filloux@mondaynote.com

@filloux

Building a business news aggrefilter

 

This February 10, Les Echos launches its business news aggrefilter. For the French business media group, this is a way to gain critical working knowledge of the semantic web. Here is how we did it. An why. 

The site is called Les Echos 360 and is separate from our flagship site LesEchos.fr, the digital version of the French business daily Les Echos. As the newly coined word aggrefilter indicates, it is an aggregation and filtering system. It is to be the kernel from which many digital products and extensions we have in mind will spring.

My idea to build an aggrefilter goes back to… 2007. That year, in San Francisco, I met Dan Farber, at the time editor-in-chief of CNet (now at CBS Interactive, his blog here) – and actual father of the aggrefilter term. Dan told me: ‘You should have a look at Techmeme. It’s an “aggrefilter” that collects technology news and ranks them based on their importance to the news cycle’. I briefly explored the idea of building such an aggrefilter, but found it too hard to do it from scratch, off-the-shelf aggrefilter software didn’t exist yet. The task required someone like Techmeme founder Gabe Rivera – who holds a PhD in computer science. I shelved the idea for a while.

360 cap

A year ago, as the head of digital at Les Echos, I reopened the case and pitched the idea to a couple of French computer scientists specialized in text-mining — a field that had vastly improved since I first looked at it. We decided to give a shot to the idea. Why?

I believe a great media brand bearing a large sets of positive attributes (reliability, scope, depth of coverage) needs to generate an editorial footprint that goes far beyond its own production. It’s a matter of critical mass. In the case of Les Echos, we need to be the very core of business information, both for the general public and for corporations. Readers trust the content we produce, therefore they should trust the reading recommendation we make through our aggregation of relevant web sites. This isn’t an obvious move for journalists who, understandably, aren’t necessarily keen to send traffic to third party web sites. (Interestingly enough, someone at the New York Times told me that a heated debate flared up  within the newsroom a few years ago: To which extent should NYT.com direct readers to its competitors? Apparently, market studies settled the issue by showing that readers of the NYT online actually tended to also like it for being a reliable prescriber.)

In the business field, unlike Google News that crawls an unlimited trove of sources, my original idea was to extract good business stories from both algorithmically and manually selected sources. More importantly, the idea was to bring to the surface, to effectively curate specialized sources — niche web sites and blogs — usually lost in the noise. Near-real-time information also seemed essential, hence the need for an automated gathering process, Techmeme-like. (Techmeme is now supplemented by Mediagazer, one of my favorite readings.)

Where do we go from here?

Initially, we turned to the newsroom, asking beat reporters for a list of reliable sources they regularly monitored. The idea was to build a qualified corpus based on suggestions from our in-house specialists. Techmeme and Mediagazer call it their “leaderboard” (see theirs for tech and media). Perhaps we didn’t have the right pitch, or we were misunderstood, but all we got was a lukewarm reception. Our partner, the French startup Syllabs, came up with a different solution, based on Twitter analysis.

We used our reporters’ 72 most active Twitter accounts to extract URLs embedded in their tweets. This first pass yielded about 5000 URLs, but most turned out to be useless because, most of the time, reporters linked their tweets to their own or their colleagues’ newsroom stories. Then, Syllabs engineers had another idea, they data-mined tweets from people followed by our staff. This yielded 872,000 URLs. After that, another filtering pass found out the true curators, the people who found original sources around the web. Retweets also were counted as they indicate a vote of relevance/confidence. After further statistical analysis of tweet components, the 872,000 URLs were boiled down to less than 400 original sources that were to become the basis of Les Echos 360’s Leaderboard (we are now down to 160 sources).

Building a corpus of sources is one thing, but ranking articles with respect to their weight in the news cycle is yet another story. Every hour, 1,500 to 2,000 news pieces go through a filtering process that defines their semantic footprint (with its associated taxonomy). Then, they are aggregated in “clusters”. Eventually, clusters are ranked based according to a statistical analysis of their “signal” in the general news-flow. Each “Clustering” (collection + ranking) contains 400-500 clusters, a process that more than occasionally overloads our computers.

Despite continuous revisions to its 19,000 lines of code, the system is far from perfect. As expected. In fact it needs two sets of tunings: One to maintaining a wide enough spectrum of sources to properly reflect the diversity of topics we want to cover. With a caveat: profusion doesn’t necessarily create quality. Crawling the long tail of potentially good sources continues to prove difficult. The second needed adjustment is finding the right balance between all parameters: update frequency, the “quality index” of sources – and many other criteria I won’t disclose here. This I compare to the mixing console inside a recording studio. Finding the right sound is tricky.

It took years for Techmeme to refine its algorithm. It might take a while for Les Echos 360 — that’s why we are launching the site in beta (a notion not widely shared in the media sector.) No surprise, a continuous news-flow is an extremely difficult moving target. As for Techmeme and Mediagazer, despite refinements in Gabe Rivera’s work, their algorithm is “rectified” by more than a dozen editors (who even rewrite headlines to make them more explicit and punchier). A much lighter crew will monitor Les Echos 360 through a back-office that will allow us to change cluster rankings and to eliminate parasitic items.

For Les Echos’ digital division, this aggrefilter is a proof of concept, a way to learn a set of technologies we consider essential for the company’s future. The digital news business will be increasingly driven by semantic processes; these will allow publishers to extract much more value from news items, whether they are produced in-house or aggregated/filtered. That is especially true for a business news provider: the more specialized the corpus, the higher the need for advanced processing. Fortunately, it is much easier to fine-tune an aggrefilter for a specific field (logistics, clean-tech, M&A, legal affairs…) than for wider and muddier streams of general news. This new site is just the tip of the iceberg. We built this engine to address a wide array of vertical, business-to-business, needs. It aims to be a source of tangible revenue.

frederic.filloux@mondaynote.com

@filloux 

 

Why Twitter needs a design reset

 

Twitter is the archetype of a greatly successful service that complacently iterates itself without much regard for changes in its uses. Such behavior makes the service — and others like it — vulnerable to disruptive newcomers. 

Twitter might be the smartest new media of the decade, but its user interface sucks. None of its heavy users is ready to admit it for simple reason: Twitter is fantastic in broadcast mode, but terrible in consumption mode. Herein lies the distortion: most Twitter promoters broadcast tweets as much as they read them. The logical consequence is a broad complacency: Twitter is great, because its most intensive broadcasters say so. The ones who rarely tweet but use the service as a permanent and tailored news feed are simply ignored. They suffer in silence — and they are up for grabs by the inevitable disrupter.

Twitter’s integration can’t be easier. Your Tweet it from any content, from your desktop with an app accessible in the toolbar, or from your smartphone. Twitter guarantees instant execution followed by immediate gratification: right after the last keystroke, your tweet is up for a global propagation.

But when it comes to managing your timeline, it’s a different story. Unless you spend most of  your time on Tweeter, you miss many interesting items. Organizing feeds is a cumbersome process. Like everybody else, I tried many Twitter’s desktop or mobile apps. None of them really worked for me. Even TweetDeck seems to have been designed by an IBM coder from the former Soviet régime. I looked around my professional environment and was stunned by the number of people who acknowledge going back to the basic Tweeter app after unsuccessful tries elsewhere.

Many things are wrong in the Twitter’s user interface and it’s time to admit it. In the  real world, where my 4G connection too often falls back to a sluggish EDGE network, watching a Tweeter feed in a mobile setting becomes a nightmare. It happens to me every single day.

Here is a short list of nice-to-have features:

Background Auto-refresh. Why do I have to perform a manual refresh in my Twitter app each time I’m going to my smartphone (even though the app is running in the background)? My email client does it, so do many apps that push contents to my device. Alternatively, I’d be happy with refresh preset intervals and not having to struggle to catch up with stuff I might have missed…
Speaking of refreshes, I would love to see iOS and Android coming up with a super-basic refresh system: as long as my apps are open in the background, I would have a single “Update Now” button telling all my relevant apps (Email reader, RSS reader, Twitter, Google Current, Zite, Flipboard, etc.) to quickly upload the stuff I’m used to read while I still have a decent signal.

Save the Tweet feature. Again, when I ride the subway (in Paris, London or NYC), I get a poor connection – at best. Then, why not offer a function such as a gentle swipe of my thumb to put aside a tweet that contains an interesting link for later viewing?

Recommendation engine. Usually, I will follow someone I spot within the subscriptions of someone I already follow and appreciate. Or from a retweet. Twitter knows exactly what my center of interests are. Therefore it would be perfectly able to match my “semantic footprint” to others’.

Tag system. Again, Twitter maintains a precise map of many of its users, or at least of those categorized as “influencers”. When I subscribe to someone who already has thousands of followers, why not tie this user to metadata vectors that will categorize my feeds? Overtime, I would built a formidable cluster of feeds catering to my obsessions…

I’m puzzled by Twitter’s apparent inability to understand the needs of the basic users. The company is far from unique in this regard.; instead, it keeps relying on a self-centered elite of trendy aficionados to maintain the comfy illusion of universal approval – until someone comes up with a radical new approach.

This is the “NASA/SpaceX syndrome”. For decades, NASA kept sending people and crafts to space in the same fashion: A huge administrative machine, coordinating thousands of contractors. As Jason Pontin wrote in his landmark piece of the MIT’s Technology Review:

In all, NASA spent $24 billion, or about $180 billion in today’s dollars, on Apollo; at its peak in the mid-1960s, the agency enjoyed more than 4 percent of the federal budget. The program employed around 400,000 people and demanded the collaboration of about 20,000 companies, universities, and government agencies. 

Just to update Pontin’s statement, the International Space Station cost $100bn to build over a ten years period and needs about $3bn per year to operate.

That was until a major disrupter, namely Elon Musk came up with a different way to build a rocket. His company, Space X, has a long way to go but it is already able to send objects (and soon people) to the ISS at a fraction of Nasa’s cost. (Read the excellent story The Shared Genius of Elon Musk and Steve Jobs by Chris Anderson in Fortune.)

In the case of the space exploration, Elon Musk-the-outsider, along with its “System-level design thinking powered by extraordinary conviction” (as Anderson puts it), simply broke Nasa’a iteration cycle with a completely different approach.

That’s how tech company become vulnerable: they keep iterating their product instead of inducing disruption within their own ranks. It’s the case for Twitter, Microsoft, Facebook.

There is one obvious exception – and a debatable one. Apple appears to be the only one able to nurture disruption in its midst. One reason is the obsessive compartmentalization of development projects wrapped in paranoid secrecy. Apple creates an internal cordon sanitaire  that protects new products from outside influences – even within the company itself. People there work on products without kibitzing, derivative, “more for less” market research.

Google operates differently as it encourages disruption with its notorious 20% of work time that can be used by engineers to work on new-new things (only Google’s dominant caste is entitled to such contribution). It also segregated GoogleX, its “moonshots” division.

To conclude, let me mention one tiny example of a general-user approach that collides with convention. It involves the unsexy world of calendars on smartphones. At first sight not a fertile field of outstanding innovation. Then came PeekCalendar, a remarkably simple way to manage your schedule (video here) on an iPhone.

Peek-Photo3

This app was developed by Squaremountains.com, a startup created by an IDEO alumni, and connected to Estonian company Velvet. PeekCalendar is gently dismissed by techno-pundits as only suitable for not-so-busy people. I tested it and – with a few bugs – it nicely accommodates my schedule  of 25-30 appointments a week.

Showing this app during design sessions with my team at work also made me feel that the media sphere is by no mean immune to the criticism I detailed above. Our industry is too shy when it comes to design innovations. Most often, for fear of losing our precious readership, we carefully iterate instead of seeking disruption. Inevitably, a young company with nothing to lose nor preserve will come up with something new and eat our lunch. Maybe it’s time to Think Different™.

frederic.filloux@mondaynote.com
@filloux 

 

Those media assets that are worth nothing

 

The valuation gap between high tech and media companies has never been wider. The erosion  of their revenue model might be the main culprit, but management teams, unions and boards of directors also bear their heavy share of responsibility. 

Two weeks ago, with a transaction that reset the value of printed assets to almost nothing, the French market for newsmagazines collapsed for good. Le Monde acquired 65% of the weekly Le Nouvel Observateur for a mere €13.4m ($18m), at a valuation of €20m ($27m). In fact, thanks to convoluted transaction terms, Le Monde will actually disburse less than €10m for its controlling share.

This number is a hard fact, it confirms the downward spiral of French legacy media values. For a while, rumors have been flying about bids for prominent newsmagazines that would float around €20m. At the same time, Lagardère Groupe (a €7bn media conglomerate based in Paris) put most of its French magazines on the block, saying it would close them down if no buyer showed up. It turned out to be a “good” way to tip potential bidders, they can now sit and wait for prices to come down as balance sheets continue to deteriorate. This brilliant strategy is attributable to Arnaud Lagardère, the son of Jean-Luc Lagardère, the swashbuckling group founder. The heir is fond of tennis, top-models and embarrassing statements. He once said of himself: “Maybe [he] is incompetent, but not dishonest” — definitely right on the first count. Today, Lagardère Groupe faces a negative value for a large part of its magazine portfolio, meaning it is willing to actually pay the buyer willing to acquire a publication.

I discussed this situation with financial analysts in Paris and London. They are unforgivingly critical of the causes for this unprecedented value depletion. For a start, newsweeklies paid the price of deteriorating copy sales (roughly -15% for 2013) and of an anemic advertising market. But the real sin, these analysts point out, is the delay in transforming and restructuring companies. One put it bluntly:  “It is clear there won’t be a single euro left for shareholders who didn’t do their job. Today, every acquisition on the French market is first and foremost weighed down by the need for a costly restructuring, which, in addition, will take three or for times longer than in the UK or elsewhere in Europe”.

The case of Le Nouvel Observateur is the perfect example. This iconic magazine of the French social democrats perfectly fits the picture of a nursing home where residents don’t do much while waiting for the unavoidable end. A thick layer of journalists there are keen to praise the weekly: “You come on a tuesday morning to write your column and by the following thursday, you’re gone. I don’t complain.” Two insiders told me that one of the events that finally pushed the aging owner of the “Nouvel Obs” to sell was the nixing of a timid management proposal: cutting one week of vacation (out of twelve) to save money. Also true, a good third of the staff actually does working hard to produce the magazine week after week. But a digital transformation — comparable, for instance, to what the Atlantic Media Group undertook is the US — is a dream completely out of reach.

From an investor standpoint, buying the Nouvel Observateur means spending from the outset €15m to €20m, just to realign the company with decent working practices. French laws and collective bargaining do not help. In the case of Le Nouvel Observateur, the change in ownership will trigger a “clause of transfer” that will entitle every journalist to leave the company with at least one month of salary per year of employment (raised to 120% of the monthly wage beyond 15 years). For the upper layer of the newsroom that will see their working habits incompatible with a probable productivity realignment, this could be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to reward their long and tranquil tenure… at a cost of several million euros for the new owner. The same goes for mandatory buyouts, the customary way to push out people no longer needed. (What is Le Monde buying you might ask? Basically a 500,000 subscribers base, a better bargaining position on the advertising market, add a dose of vanity…)

Again, from a investor perspective, being forced to spend €15m-20m before allocating the first cent to a transformative investment is a severe deterrent. This mechanism also threatens daily newspapers such as Liberation (another icon of the French left wing, where I spent 12 years of my career). Isolated, stuck with a single product, dealing with a 35% decline in its paid circulation last year, a weak advertising base and a discredited management (in a recent internal vote, 90% of staff mistrust the bosses), a negative P&L despite €12m in State subsidies, this company faces a certain death unless it radically transforms itself. Its only way to survive might be to forgo the costly daily print edition, move to a well-crafted weekly distributed in selected urban areas, and extend it to realtime digital coverage on web, mobile and tablet. But such a move would mean yet another downsizing, along with heavy costs. No one is willing to be dragged into such “social Vietnam”, as one of my interlocutors puts it.

Those who advise potential buyers are quick to point out that, if the goal is to take a position in the digital world, their money would better be spent in building a pure player from the ground up. With €20 or 40 million, you can definitely build something powerful in the journalistic field.

The highly publicized startup culture — some would say “ideology” — with its unparalleled mixture of agility and skyrocketing valuations contributes to the demise of legacy medias. Consider the table below. It shows the gap between the valuation of each customer of social networks and legacy media:

305 valuations

For what it’s worth, this comparison illustrates the tremendous loss in value for legacy media. Several actually make (slim) profits while digital companies such as Pinterest or Snapchat don’t even have a revenue model. But as unfair as it sounds, investors — venture capital firms, Wall Street, high tech giants — are betting on two factors: the scalability of current user bases (with factors 10x or 20x being the norm) and also the ability of digital players to swiftly adjust themselves to quickly changing environments. Two qualities unfortunately not associated with legacy media.

frederic.filloux@mondaynote.com

 

Is Yahoo serious about media?

 

Under Marissa Mayer’s leadership, Yahoo keeps making substantial efforts to become a major news media player. Will a couple of well-know bylines and a shiny mobile app do the job? 

A big Silicon Valley player entering the news business has long been the worst nightmare of legacy publishers. Combining an array of high tech products with the ability to get all the talent money can buy, the Valley giant could be truly disruptive. Ten years ago, the ongoing fantasy was Google or a Yahoo gulping the New York Times or another such big media property. For many reasons — economical as well as cultural ones — it didn’t happen. Yahoo once approached NYT’s columnist Thomas Friedman, offering him a hefty pay raise to become its star writer. But the Times’ globo-pundit quickly backed off when he realized that most of his reputation —  as arguable as it can be (see the cruel Tom Friedman OpEd Generator) — was tied to his employer. Yahoo and others put the issue at rest for years, focusing on core challenges: survival for Yahoo and global domination for Google.

Until now.

Last year, we first witnessed a significant move from the tech galaxy: Jeff Bezos acquired the Washington Post by. As mentioned in the Monday Note (see the Memos To Jeff series), Amazon’s technical firepower will undoubtedly exert a transformative — rather than merely incremental — impact on the Post. Further, I guess this will end up being a welcome stimulus for the entire industry, it really needs a tech kick in its sagging backside.

Then came the Yahoo initiatives. Last fall, Marissa Mayer, snatched three visible talents from the New York Times: Megan Liberman, until then the Times’ deputy news editor, was appointed Yahoo News editor in chief; Mayer also tapped iconic tech columnist David Pogue; a month later, she picked the Times’ chief political correspondent Matt Bai. Finally, on November 25th, Marissa Mayer announced that she hired former TV host Katie Couric as the portal’s “global anchor”.

Here we are: Expect Yahoo to simultaneously enter three major information segments: General audience programming with Katie Couric’s show; political and national issues; and tech coverage (in addition to the classical Food site). Logically, Yahoo started with the tech side. Pogue himself introduced Yahoo Tech on stage at CES last week — and didn’t pass up the opportunity to blast its competitors, mocking their nerdy and obscure language. Interface wise, I found the site pretty clever with its one page, endless scrolling structure — a trend to be noticed —  and articles showcased in about 120 tiles (approx 7 tiles x 18 rows), each expanding as needed and keeping its own URL, which is essential for social sharing uses.

Regardless of David Pogue’s ability to put a the human face on technology, Yahoo Tech is entering an increasingly crowded segment. This month, the Wall Street Journal rolled out WSJD, set to take Walt Mossberg’s and Kara Swisher’s AllThingsD slot, itself reborn as Re/Code (can’t find a geekier name), operated by the same duo. The Re/Code money machine will be the already sold-out Code Conference and its offsprings. WSJD features potent editorial firepower with no less than 50 writers on deck.

Marissa Mayer made no mystery of the fact that her editorial initiatives will be directed at Yahoo’s #1 priority, “the company’s commitment to mobile”. When she landed at Yahoo, Mayer was dismayed to discover that everyone received a Blackberry. Now, the company wants to board every relevant ecosystem, starting with iOS and Android.

That’s what Yahoo does with its interesting NewsDigest App for iOS, launched at CES. As its tech web site does, the mobile app focuses on a series of hot trends. First of all, with its truncated structure, the app borrows a lot from Circa (see a previous Monday Note); it also inherits technology developed by Summly, the startup it acquired in March last year (merely five months after the app’s launch). Summly’s core idea is a news summarizing algorithm. The NewsDigest iteration does actually much more than condensing stories: In a neat interface, it creates context by slicing coverage as follows:
–Image gallery
–Infographics
–Maps
–Stock charts
–Main Twitter feeds
–Video
–Wikipedia
…plus a set of references if you want more.

For a story picked up yesterday, it looks like this:

304_yahoo_news

Evidently, there is room for improvement. Weirdly enough, the app is updated only twice a day and carries less than ten stories. Both elements go against the idea of a smartphone app supposed to update on a permanent and to provide content in an endless stream. Plus, automated as it is, the prose can’t quite compete for a Pulitzer Prize. But, if Yahoo decides to hand the key ingredients over to a competent editorial team, the NewsDigest could become a really good product.

Coming back to this column’s main topic, I believe Yahoo is really up to something in the news sector:
— Yahoo enjoys huge traction in the mobile world: According to Marissa Mayer, among the 800 million people who access Yahoo every month (excluding Tumbler), roughly 400 million reach the portal through their mobile phone. (Despite that number, one irritating thing: Yahoo made its app available to the US AppStore only, ignoring the hundreds millions of English-speaking users on other shores, East and West of Sunnyvale, California.)
— Unlike with Google’s mobile strategy, Yahoo is free from Android’s strategic goals and from a difficult relationship with Apple. It can therefore play the two ecosystems equally, opening the potential for one to gain leverage against the other.
— Even better, by last week acquiring Aviate, an Android customizing interface layer, Yahoo can now create its own branded experience on top of the standard Android interface.
— Assuming it enters the news business for good, Yahoo will act like a tech company, not a legacy media one. In other words, it will first build a sizable audience for its news ecosystem while deliberately ignoring the revenue side as long as needed. Then, it will optimize and datamine this user base to understand in the most granular way what works and what doesn’t. Having successfully gone through those steps, Yahoo will then transform the (hopefully vast) newly acquired audience into a money machine.
This is the way it works nowadays.

frederic.filloux@mondaynote.com

@filloux

 

Surviving 2014

 

2014 won’t be an easy year for the digital news business. The good news is the list of mandatory actions is coming into sharper focus. Today, we look at key items.  

The hard part is finding positive signs. My own guess: for the news industry, the excruciating migration from print to digital will get worse before it gets better. If I had to draw a J curve, as economists put it, it would look like this:

303-J-curve

Note that the green list is longer than the red one. But we are still not through with the negative key factors.

For the news media industry, advertising will remain problematic this year. The graph below sums up the sector’s dire situation (a US view that mostly applies to other mature markets):

303 revenue

For 2014, planet remains badly aligned:

There is nothing is sight to correct the huge imbalance between the supply of digital advertising space and advertisers’ demand. Digital media continue to produce millions of new URLs per day that banners simply can’t match. As long as no one is willing to reduce the supply-side, the imbalance is likely to last. This is even more regrettable when considering how the media industry will need to increase its own promotion activities in order to support the diversification that is key to its survival. Practically, if an online publication decided to close 30% of its inventory and assign it to promote its mobile apps, verticals, ancillary products, etc., it would win on both ends. First, it would recreate some scarcity, meaning higher revenue metrics and, second, it would beef up the promotion of its own products. Unfortunately, such an idea won’t last a minute in a short-term budgetary review.
– Thanks to Real-Time Bidding (RTB), publishers actually fuel the price deflation
by auctioning their leftover inventory on various marketplaces. In doing so, they generate some revenue – at the expense of the format’s per unit value (in such auctions, expect no more than 5-10% of nominal prices). In addition this process mechanically applies negative pressure to premium placements because the advertisers will opportunistically purchase a guaranteed and targeted audience wherever available. Even the New York Times will jump on the RTB bandwagon  — “in [its] special way”, it claims. We’ll see.
- Making serious money with mobile ads will remain elusive. For most digital news outlets, mobile users are likely to pass the 50% of the total audience later this year. Unfortunately, the magic advertising formula has yet to be cracked as a mobile user only brings a fraction of the equivalent web revenue. I don’t believe in a miracle ad format that will make the commercial experience “engaging” or “enjoyable”… You don’t “engage” people on the move. You grab, seduce, retain them with repetitive and attractive contents that properly fit their time-wise needs and cognitive availability. Then, if the content is good enough, unique, and able to create a reflexive daily habit — then you might be able to convince a fraction of the audience to pay for it. Note the italics, they point to significant obstacles on the road to the mobile pot of gold.
On mobile, I feel interface quality and selectiveness of functionalities are even less forgiving than on the web: you can’t allow useless stuff on a smartphone screen, there is simply no tolerance for it. All contents being equal, the success of a mobile news product will largely depend on the quality of its interface.

Now let’s turn to the green part, the hopeful one.

Agility. One of the benefits of the continuing newsrooms shrinkage (no, we’re not through, yet) will be news staffs making further gains in agility and polyvalence. As Scott Klein, senior editor for news applications at ProPublica, puts it in the NiemanLab Predictions for 2014 (worth a read):

You can be a good journalist without being able to do lots of things. But every skill you don’t have leaves a whole class of stories out of your reach. And data stories are usually the ones that are hiding in plain sight.

Scraping websites, cleaning data, and querying Excel-breaking data sets are enormously useful ways to get great stories. If you don’t know how to write software to help you acquire and analyze data, there will always be a limit to the size of stories you can get by yourself. And that’s a limit that somebody who competes with you won’t have.

To put it more bluntly, in 2014, thriving newsrooms will share the following characteristics: (a) they will be fastest to inject a critical proportion of new blood in their ranks and (b) they will invest in training to add the skills, mostly tech ones, required by modern journalism.

New Forms of Ads. Digital Advertising is half-way through a decisive transformation. As I wrote here many times, the market will stretch at its extremities; one will end up with more automation (the aforementioned RTB trap) while the other end might be more virtuous. It will be based on tailored promotional operations and Branded Content product lines (see coverage in the Monday Note), both form carrying higher CPMs and better reader acceptance. I’m a true believer in the continuity — not the blend nor the confusion — between journalistic contents and commercial editorial. Brand, companies, have a lot to tell beyond traditional advertising. Most publishers will be slow movers in that field. Even if such new forms of ads turn to be a fad (which I don’t believe), it won’t be a costly mistake to hire a commercial editor flanked by a couple of smart people, a combination of writers and strategic planners (not easy to find, I’ll admit, you might instead consider training existing staff), able to understand and convert client needs into good storytelling aimed at attracting (but not deceiving) readers.

2014 will be the year of media companies realizing they must morph into technology companies — or embrace, one way another, the technologies that guarantee their survival. Consider the following factors: advertising requiring better audience profiling; smart recommendation engines becoming mandatory to retain readers; semantic “footprint” becoming the de rigueur instrument to serve a solvent and loyal readership; journalism thriving through data… These all make the need for tech people able to understand editorial issues more pressing.

As long as those prerequisites are well understood, I’m bullish on the future of digital news.

–frederic.filloux@mondaynote.com
@filloux