mobile internet

The “Love Triangle”: Apple, Google and Verizon

At the end of my August 9th Monday Note, “War in the Valley, Apple vs. Google”, I committed to get into Google’s potential weaknesses in this conflict. Since then, things have gotten a tad more complicated.

The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

As discussed last August, Eric Schmidt, Google’s CEO, had to leave Apple’s Board of Directors because, even for a Valley used to “coopetition”, the conflict of interest became really blatant.

Both companies make operating systems for smartphones, the new wave of personal computing. There, we have Android vs. iPhone OS. For the desktop, it’s Chrome OS vs. OS X. Yes, for the desktop: Chrome OS purports to be a Cloud-oriented netbook OS but, as explained in the same August 9th MN, Chrome smuggles very substantial desktop code under the cover of “mere” browser plug-ins, this to let Chrome OS stay useful in the absence of a Net connection. Picasa competes with iPhoto, Chrome, the browser, not the OS, competes with Safari. In July, Apple bought PlaceBase, a mapping company, whose Web site is now reduced to a set of API (Applications Programming Interface) documents, very likely to gain independence from Google Maps.
The more we dig, the more we find places where both companies want to pick the same pockets. If you think about it some more, both companies behave as if they’d want all your attention and all your money. Still ruminating, could it be both companies no longer take Microsoft seriously and, having lost a common enemy must now be at each other’s throat?

Then, we have Verizon and Apple. The “love” between these two has been hot since or, actually, before the very beginning of the iPhone. A few weeks before the inaugural June 30th, 2007 shipment of the JesusPhone, Verizon incautiously circulated the now semi-famous “iWhatever” memo to its troops, dissing the iPhone and its maker. 50 million (we’ll see the latest numbers in about 10 days) iPhones and iPod Touch(es) later, Verizon is more than ever dead set against letting Dear Leader have its way with its business model. To Verizon, AT&T’s fate is anathema: AT&T let Apple “run the table” for digital media sales over its wireless network. Put more crudely, AT&T bent over and became a “dumb pipe”, a wireless ISP in the service of the iTunes content distribution and revenue engine. For this unnatural act, AT&T got a $100 ARPU (Average Revenue Per User, the industry-wide average is about $50) and the use of the iPhone as a lure to steal Verizon subscribers. Verizon can’t stand that thought, they want to keep their birthright, that is a piece of every bit of digital content revenue moving through its network. More

A Blinding Flash of The Obvious

In the US, if Apple gave up on the AT&T exclusivity, the iPhone’s market share would double. So says Morgan Stanley’s anal-yst Kathryn Huberty. See this PC World piece here. And a CNN/Fortune Magazine piece here.

Let’s not throw stones at Ms. Huberty but, instead, question her bosses’ wisdom, work ethics or wakefulness. Is anyone editing the firm’s publications? Isn’t Morgan Stanley missing the real fight, the big struggle between Apple and carriers for mobile Internet content billions?’

First, Huberty’s thesis: If AT&T no longer had an exclusive distribution agreement for the iPhone, if, for example, Verizon also “offered” Apple’s smartphone, the device’s market share would more than double from about 4.9% to 12.2%. (In passing: what’s the last digit’s significance? Those are estimates, not measurements, good within a ± 10% margin of error, at the very best. Spreadsheet follies…)
Morgan Stanley’s seer bases her prophecy on French market share numbers after Orange lost its exclusivity and the other two carriers, SFR and Bouygues, gained access to the iPhone. The legend is the iPhone’s market share shot up by 136% as a result.

I’m sorry but that’s a lot of BS; there are no facts to substantiate such a claim.Readers probably know I’m a French-born Silicon Valley-based venture investor; I travel to the old country four or five times a year and keep reasonably close tabs on industry and political goings-on there.
Clouding the discussion with facts: The iPhone has been available from Orange since October 25th, 2007. The other carriers sued and local regulatory authorities subsequently nixed the Orange exclusivity. As a result, SFR started shipping iPhones in April of 2009, about six months ago. And Bouygues did the same about five months ago. Since 2007, Orange alone sold about 1.5 million iPhones. If Bouygues and SFR sold a generous 500,000 units since April 2009, how does this constitute a 136% market share increase?

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War in the Valley: Apple vs. Google

It was long overdue: Eric Schmidt (Google’s CEO) finally resigned from Apple’s Board of Directors. Usually, these resignations are handled in the smoothest of ways: Thanks for the distinguished service and the like. This time, Steve Jobs issued a pointed statement: “Unfortunately, as Google enters more of Apple’s core businesses, with Android and now Chrome OS, Eric’s effectiveness as an Apple Board member will be significantly diminished, since he will have to recuse himself from even larger portions of our meetings due to potential conflicts of interest.” Full officialese here.

This is the Valley and its cozy relationships. By which I mean executives and directors sitting on one another’s board, competitors enjoying the same directors, venture firms “sharing” their partners around portfolio companies. For example, besides Eric Schmidt sitting on both Apple’s and Google’s boards, we have Arthur Levinson, head of Genentech, a director of both companies. Or partners at Sequoia (a very successful venture capital firm)
 sitting on boards at YouTube and Google, which might have help a successful “exit”, that is the sale of YouTube to Google.
Back to Apple, there are also lingering allegations of a no-poach agreement, one by which the companies agreed no to hire each other’s workers.
Closer to home: Be, Inc., the operating system company I founded with a few friends from Apple and elsewhere. For a while, one of our investors (and director) also sat on Microsoft’s board. Microsoft executives were investors in his firm and we ended up with Bill Gates (indirectly) owning a piece of Be. Ah well… That was a decade ago, the statute of limitations ran out.
The SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission), the stock market regulator, has become more aggressive in watching out for companies engaging in collusive behavior through cross-directorships. See here .

Back to Dear Leader’s words: Google enters more of Apple’s core business. More

Apple’s Jesus Tablet: What For?

If you went on vacation and renounced Internet access for the duration, you might not have heard the latest rumors concerning the iTablet a.k.a. the Jesus Tablet, Apple’s eagerly awaited entry into the putative bigger than an iPhone but smaller than a MacBook segment. I’m avoiding the n-word: for Apple, this is the no-book category…
As for the religious nickname, let’s go back to MacWorld, in January 2007. Steve Jobs walks on stage and demonstrates the “iPod of phones”. The audience reacts with such religious fervor that, for a while, wags call Steve’s latest miracle the Jesus phone. (I could go on and call AT&T’s network the iPhone’s cross, but I won’t.)

Back to 2009, for the past week, we’ve had the strongest wave to date of rumors and speculation regarding Apple’s second coming (after the Newton, see below) into the tablet space. Putting such froth down would be ignoring the desire, the hope behind the agitation. The Greater We seems to want something bigger than and iPhone and smaller than a 13” MacBook, currently Apple’s smaller laptop.

Great, but what for? More

The Real iPhone 1.0

Saint Peter offers a choice of hells to a recently dematerialized high-tech tycoon (pick your favorite sinner) with a long list of transgressions. The basic one, fire, floggings, and the premium one, plenty of music, drink, food and other pleasures of the flesh. Said tycoon picks the fun venue, Saint Peter pulls a lever, the industrialist falls to the one and only fiery hell. Agitated, feeling cheated, the sinner demands to know about the other hell, the eternal party.
Saint Peter: It’s a demo!

The joke comes to mind as I watch Steve Jobs introduce the iPhone on stage at San Francisco’s MacWorld Expo, on January 9th, 2007.
It is too good to be true, especially the part about running OS X. The demo looks magical, as with most of Steve’s acts. The iPhone looks like one shocking product. But is it real? Nothing specifically aimed at the demonstrator, I’ve seen – and given – too many demos, it’s a sinner speaking.

Six months later, I’m relieved. The first iPhones ship, enterprising programmers manage to inspect the firmware’s insides and, yes, it is OS X. A trimmed-down version, of course, but the core of the iPhone’s software engine is the genuine article. More

Fun AT&T numbers

by Jean-Louis Gassée

AT&T can’t seem to catch a break. A couple of weeks ago, at All Things Digital, an industry conference, Randall Stephenson, AT&T’s Chairman, got the audience to snicker and roll eyes. The conference is held by the Wall Street Journal, led by its digital guru, Walt Mossberg and, “by invitation only”, $5K a pop, gathers movers, shakers and wannabes of what is now broadly called the digital media industry.
Mr. Stephenson was on stage, answering Walt Mossberg apparently softball questions. But, when you look more closely, Walt applies a trial attorney’s precept: Only ask questions for which you already know the answers, let the jury see how the witness responds. We were the jury as Walt asked the AT&T top dog about its wireless network performance problems. The witness got off to a decent start: “Yes, when the iPhone 3G came out we weren’t ready.” Then, he proceeded to claim things had significantly improved. That’s when the snickering started. In Silicon Valley, we all know the blank spots, the bad 3G coverage, right in the heart of high-tech’s garment district. See the full interview here.

Later, Stephenson committed a faux pas of Detroit proportions: he claimed everything (phone, Internet connection, TV) worked well when he moved to his new home in Texas. Really? AT&T’s Chairman, CEO and President gets a good connection? In a further misguided attempt to connect with his audience, he even mentioned his Apple TV. Clearly, he’s one of us, a discerning Apple customer… More