Apple’s Intriguing Developer Conference

371_main

by Jean-Louis Gassée

At this year’s Worldwide Developer conference, we were told about Apple’s new music streaming service and given hints about the iPad’s future… and we were left asking questions about Apple’s relationship with Google.

Apple’s yearly Worldwide Developer Conference has a well-established, festive tradition of announcing new software tools. One way to gauge reactions to the conference is to count the number of articles that imply that Apple is simply playing catch-up: “Apple finally does X that competitor Y has been doing for Z years.” More

image_pdfimage_print

More facts on mobile 

wireframe-mobile-blueprint

by Frederic Filloux

New mobile internet trends have caught my attention this week. Today, we look at their impact on the news business. (1)

In developing countries, mobile growth keeps accelerating.

  • In Nigeria (pop: 173 million, median age: 18), based on page views count, 76% of internet traffic now comes from mobile.
  • In India (pop: 1.25 billion), the rate is 65%. As a comparison, the proportion is 23% in the UK, 22% in the United States and 14% in France.

At least, four elements drive mobile growth in emerging countries: More

image_pdfimage_print

You Don’t Need An Apple Watch – Part 253

370_watch

by Jean-Louis Gassée

One more time, with feeling: You don’t need this [blank] Apple product. This time, pundits believe you shouldn’t buy an Apple Watch. But will the Greater We listen this time?

I’ve been professionally and sentimentally involved with tech products for more than six decades. Luckily, my affection for new technology has (mostly) been requited: The objects of my desire have rewarded me with fun and financial independence. More

image_pdfimage_print

New generation CMS can help monetizing quality journalism

369_new
by Frederic Filloux

Monetizing digital journalism requires one key ingredient: Causing quality contents to emerge from the internet’s background noise. New kinds of Content Management Systems and appropriate syntax can help in a decisive way. 

Until now, mining good journalism from the web’s depths has been done from the top. Over the last 13 years, looking for “signals” that flag quality content has been at the core of Google News: With a search engine scanning and ranking 50,000 sources in 30 languages and 72 editions, its inventor, the famous computer Scientist Krishna Bharat, has taken his extraordinary breakthrough to an immense scale. More

image_pdfimage_print

Apple Watch: Five Weeks, A Dog’s View

369_mainJLG
by Jean-Louis Gassée

[This is an updated version]

After a few supply chain hiccups, the Apple Watch is now in the wild. I’ve had mine since April 24th, enough time to educate my opinion: Is this a truly new genre or simply an elegant version of a gratuitous accessory?

Technology reviewers — and customers — come in two species: Cats and Dogs. When presented with a new brand of cat food, our feline masters tiptoe suspiciously around the offering and, having carefully sniffed their human servant’s token of devotion, finally deign to sample it.

Dogs have no such sense of decorum and hierarchy, they joyously snarf up the mystery meal. More

image_pdfimage_print

Ad Blocks’ Doomsday Scenarios

368-ABP_firefox_1022

by Frederic Filloux

On the ad blocking front, the situation keeps getting worse. Until now, the media industry pretended to ignore the problem, perhaps waiting for a miracle cure. This might turn into a long lull.  

In coming weeks, a large analytic firm will release disturbing figures on the state of the ad blocking scene. According to someone who has advanced knowledge of the data, on desktop computers and on critical segments of the digital audience, the use of ad blocking keeps rising exponentially. More

image_pdfimage_print

Firing Well

DSC_0231
by Jean-Louis Gassée

Ending a work relationship needn’t be complicated or traumatic. It can be done in a sane and respectful way if a clean framework is set up at hiring time.

In an August, 2012 Monday Note titled The HR-Less Performance Review, I described a sane, humane way for an employer to conduct the dreaded Performance Review. The script is simple: More

image_pdfimage_print

Three Slides? You’re Nuts! OK. How About Seven?

by Jean-Louis Gassée

In practice, the three slide pitch may be impossibly concise. This week, we’ll look at the seven slide variation.

After last week’s Monday Note, Three Slides Then Shut Up – The Art of The Pitch, I was subjected to a bit of email ribbing. My honorable correspondents, many of them entrepreneurs themselves, questioned my rationality, insisting that it’s psychologically and emotionally impossible for entrepreneurs to be so boldly concise as to limit their presentations to three slides. Indeed, how many three-slide presentations had I actually seen in a decade+ of venture investing? Upon the fourth slide, is the presenter sent packing? More

image_pdfimage_print

Circa: What went wrong

by Frederic Filloux

365_ciracBW

Circa, the clever smartphone news app, failed to live up to its promises. The fiasco stems from the smartphone advertising market’s inherent weakness, from Circa’s inability to catch up with evolving reading habits, and from an insufficient editorial proposition.  More

image_pdfimage_print

Three Slides Then Shut Up – The Art Of The Pitch

by Jean-Louis Gassée

365_slide

This week, we look at pitches, at the stories entrepreneurs tell investors. The best pitches aren’t really pitches. Dumping one’s entire body of knowledge on easily bored investors won’t help. The best pitch is one that quickly moves from monologue to conversation.

The First 70 Minutes of The Hour. When, in 2002, I was invited to join the ranks of venture investors by Barry Weinman, my Gentleman Capitalist mentor, I voiced a concern: I didn’t want to go blind looking at PowerPoint presentations for the rest of my life. Gentleman that he is, Barry didn’t — and didn’t need to — remind me of the two hours investment pitches I had inflicted on his kind during my early entrepreneur days.

I finally learned to curb my prolix talk during the Be IPO road show in 1999. The investment bankers who helped prepare the show soundly disabused me of my prolix ways. I was relegated to the clean up position, following the VP of Marketing, our experienced CFO (three IPOs before ours), and the demo. Putting me last before the hard stop enforced concision.

Now that I’ve joined the VC brotherhood and am on the receiving end of money-seeking tall tales, I can attest that my fear of mental cauterization by PowerPoint wasn’t misplaced. I’ve found a name for the blight: The First 70 Minutes of The Hour.

The condition is caused when an entrepreneur uses the allotted hour to dump everything he or she knows about his/her business. I’m a sinner reminiscing: I’m anxious, I’m unsure which of the product’s many arcane features and benefits will click, I’m terrified that I’ll leave something out. My desperation induces acedia as the allotted hour ticks past, and, as a reward, I receive non-committal California-speak: Great, Interesting, We’ll Circle Back To You.

This is an unfair caricature, but not by much. Too many presentations concentrate on the needs of the speaker instead of addressing the interests of the audience. Fortunately, there’s a simple remedy: Show three slides and shut up. Say just enough to engage us and then move on to a lively conversation, to questions, arguments, suggestions.

The canonical three slides go like this:

  1. Who we are: The founding team’s résumé, its technical, business, and academic background.
  2. A nice, sharp dichotomy: The world before us, the world after us. Show a substantial, practical impact, not just a marginal improvement of something that’s already in place. The more impossible or unthinkable the better — it will become retroactively obvious once understood. The mouse is a good example.
  3. The Money Pump. Your business plan. I like the Money Pump image, the pipes that allow the cash that’s temporarily residing in customers’ pockets to flow into the company’s coffers – legally, willingly, and repeatedly.

After that, shut up.

The silence will be unbearable. It might help to look down at your shoes, your hands, something on the conference room table. But the awkward moment won’t last, no more than an interminable 12 to 15 seconds. If you don’t get questions, you have your answer: We’re not interested.

But if we poke holes in your story, demand explanations, play devil’s advocate, we’re hooked. You may now dig into the 253 backing slides you have under the table, whip out the market research, competitive analysis, academic studies, financial projections, and casually lay out your roadmap. Show us that you’re not afraid to think on your feet. You can even gently flatter us that we’re the visionaries, you just want to help make that vision a bit clearer.

You’re either in or you’re out, but you won’t have wasted our time or yours.

There are benefits to this approach even if we don’t buy your pitch.

If we’ve turned you down, you can call us back six months later, remind us of your “failed” three-slide presentation and offer to show us three new ones. If the first pass was quick and painless, we might ask you back in. You won’t get this welcome if you bored us for 70 minutes the first time around.

Moving forward, sharpen your internal characterization of your business. You can’t have ten success factors that are equally important. Concentrate on the top level features in your Before/After slide and leave the “really cool” pet tricks for the ensuing conversation. Remove the branches that blur the picture, but don’t hack away at the graphical details in your slides. Edward Tufte, the world’s pre-eminent “data visualizer”, has posited the counterintuitive notion that by adding visual cues we enhance comprehension. (We’ll get back to Tufte in the postscript.)

And the most important benefit: If you’ve distilled your presentation into three slides, you won’t even need them. The effort will have been so intense that they’re now burned into your brain. You can walk into a conference room, ask for a white board and a marker, and impress us with your command of your business by “extemporaneously” drawing the three slides. There will always be time to whip out your laptop, tablet, or big smartphone for the 253 FAQ (Foire Aux Questions, in French) slides.

All of this is easier said than done, of course. I can relate to anxious entrepreneurs who have a hard time sorting through the wonderful ideas brewing inside the garages in their heads. Afflicted with what Buddhists call monkey brains, I, too, have a hard time quieting the noise so I can “hear” the most important, reality-changing element of a product/service/business. Only the most gifted and focused (or perhaps the most delusional) can see the edge of the blade with unfailing clarity. The rest of us muddle through.

One point remains: The goal of the presentation is to start a conversation, the sooner the better.

JLG@mondaynote.com


Speaking of presentations, you might want to read Edward Tufte’s The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: Pitching Out Corrupts Within, a searing indictment of mindless slide presentations ($7 paperback on Amazon):

lenine

 

(Also available in PowerPoint, er, PDF format here)

Tufte’s seminal work, The Visual Display of Quantitative Information ($29.62 for the hardcover edition on Amazon and also, it seems, in PDF form here), includes this celebrated chart that tracks Napoleon’s ill-fated march to and from Russia during the abominable Winter of 1812-1813:

campagne_russie

 

The chart makes the French Army’s unimaginable losses imaginable.

image_pdfimage_print