classifieds

Schibsted’s extraordinary click machines

 

The Nordic media giant wants to be the #1 worldwide of online classifieds by replicating its high-margin business one market after another, with great discipline. 

It all starts in 2005 with a Power Point presentation in Paris. At the time, Schibsted ASA, the Norwegian media group, is busy deploying its free newspapers in Switzerland, France and Spain. Schibsted wants its French partner Ouest-France — the largest regional newspapers group — to co-invest in a weird concept: free online classifieds. As always with the Scandinavian, the deck of slides is built around a small number of key points. To them, three symptoms attest to the maturity of a market’s online classified business:  (a) The number one player in the field ranks systematically among the top 10 web sites, regardless of the category; (b) it is always much bigger than the number two; (c) it reaps most of the profits in the sector. “Look at the situation here in France”, the Norwegians say, “the first classifieds site ranks far down in Nielsen rankings. The market is up for grabs, and we intend to get it”. The Oslo and Stockholm executives already had an impressive track record: in 2000, they launched Finn.no in Norway and, in 2003, they acquired Blocket.se in Sweden. Both became incredible cash machines for the group, with margins above 50% and unabated growth. Ouest-France eventually agreed to invest 50% in the new venture. In november 2010, they sold their stake back to Schibsted at a €400m valuation. (As we’ll see in a moment, the classified site Le Bon Coin is now worth more than twice that number.)

November 2012. I’m sitting in the office of Olivier Aizac, CEO of Le Bon Coin, the French iteration of Schibsted’s free classifieds concept. The office space is dense and scattered over several floors in a building near the Paris Bourse. Since my last 2009 visit (see a previous Monday Note Learning from free classifieds), the startup grew from a staff of 15 to 150 people. And Aizac tells me he plans to hire 70 more staff in 2013. Crisis or not, the business is booming.

A few metrics: According to Nielsen, LeBonCoin.fr (French for The Right Spot) ranks #9 in France with 17m monthly unique users. With more than 6 billion page views per month, it even ranks #3, behind Facebook and Google. Revenue-wise, Le Bon Coin might hit the €100m mark this year, with a profit margin slightly above… 70%. Fort the 3rd quarter of this year, the business grew by 50% vs. a year ago.

In terms of competition it dominates every segment: cars, real estate (twice the size of Axel Springer’s SeLoger.com) and jobs with about 60,000 classifieds, roughly five times the inventory of a good paid-for job board (LeBonCoin is not positioned in the upper segment, though, it mostly targets regional small to medium businesses).

Le Bon Coin’s revenue stream is made of three parts: premium services (you pay to add a picture, a better ranking, tracking on your ad); fees coming from the growing number professionals who flock to LBC (many car dealerships put their entire inventory here); and advertising for which the primary sectors are banking and insurance, services such as mobile phone carriers or pay-TV, and automobile. Although details are scarce, LBC seems to have given up the usual banner sales, focusing instead on segmented yearly deals: A brand will target a specific demographic and LBC will deliver, for half a million or a million euros per annum.

One preconceived idea depicts Le Bon Coin as sitting at the cheaper end of the consumer market. Wrong. In the car segment, its most active advertiser is Audi for whom LBC provides tailored-made promotions. (Strangely enough Renault is much slower to catch the wave.) “We are able to serve any type of market”, says Olivier Aizac who shows an ad peddling a €1.4m Bugatti, and another for the brand new low-cost Peugeot 301, not yet available in dealerships but offered on LBC for €15,000. Similarly, LBC is the place to go to rent a villa on the Cote d’Azur or a chalet for the ski season. With more than 21 millions ads at any given moment, you can find pretty much anything there.

Now, let’s zoom out and look at a broader picture. How far can Le Bon Coin go? And how will its cluster of free classifieds impact Schibsted’s future?

Today, free online classifieds weigh about 25% of Schibsted revenue (about 15bn Norwegian Kroner, €2bn this year), but it it accounts for 47% of the group’s Ebitda (2.15bn NOK, €300m). All online activities now represent 39% of the revenue and 62% of the Ebitda.

The whole strategy can be summed up in these two charts: The first shows the global deployment of the free classifieds business (click ton enlarge):

Through acquisitions, joint ventures or ex nihilo creations, Schibsted now operates more than 20 franchises. Their development process is highly standardized. Growth phases have been codified in great detail, managers often gather to compare notes and the Oslo mothership watches everything, providing KPIs, guidelines, etc. The result is this second chart showing the spread of deployment phases. More than half of the portfolio still is in infancy, but most likely to follow the path to success:

Source: Schibsted Financial Statements

This global vision combined to what is seen as near-perfect execution explains why the financial community is betting so much on Schibsted’s classified business.

When assessing the potential of each local brand, analysts project the performances of the best and mature properties (the Nordic ones) onto the new ones. As an example, see below the number of visits per capita and per month from web and mobile since product launch:

Source : Dankse Market Equities

For Le Bon Coin’s future, this draws a glowing picture: according to Danske Market Equities, today, the Norwegian Finn.no generates ten times more revenue per page view than LBC, and twenty times more when measured by Average revenue per user (ARPU). The investment firm believes that Le Bon Coin’s revenue can reach €500m in 2015, and retain a 65% margin. (As noted by its CEO, Le Bon Coin has yet to tap into its trove of data accumulated over the last six years, which could generate highly valuable consumer profiling information).

When translated into valuation projections, the performance of Schibsted classifieds businesses far exceed the weight of traditional media properties (print and online newspapers). The sum-of-the-parts valuations drawn by several private equities firms show the value of the classifieds business yielding more than 80% of the total value of this 173 year-old group.

frederic.filloux@mondaynote.com
Disclosure: I worked for Schibsted for nine years altogether between 2001 and 2010; six years indirectly as the editor of 20 minutes and three years afterwards, in a business development unit attached to the international division.
——- 

New media valuations metrics

On September 22, the Norwegian media group Schibsted announced a transaction to make it the sole owner of the French free classifieds site LeBonCoin.fr. The valuation for the deal? €400m ($540m). I must admit it : I fell from my chair(*). Not that I look down at Le Bon Coin, au contraire. In a previous December 2009 Monday Note (Learning from free Classifieds), I explained why news media should give a closer look to such sites. In my view, they could draw inspiration from five key components: a crystal-clear interface, deep concern for its users, a proprietary value proposition, software that keeps working, and a free model… with paid-options.

Still… Four hundred million euros! In last week’s deal, Schibsted bought back the 50% stake owned by Ouest-France, the French regional newspaper group. The deal nets €140m for the Breton group – now facing a €100m restructuring of its… paper-based classifieds. The deal involves an asset swap: Ouest-France gives up a 59% EBITDA business (Le Bon Coin), and increases its stake in the company Schibsted exits, Car & Boat Media, valued at €120m, a 29% margin business. Analysts I spoke to wonder: Is this really the best move for Ouest-France? Obviously, they’re selling off a jewel. And, no less obviously, they never fully grasped the free classifieds site’s potential.

Now, let’s consider two aspects of this deal: the context for media economics, and asset valuation.

Context. The €400m valuation for Le Bon Coin, a four-year-old business, is to be viewed against the backdrop of French media goings-on. To name but one example, Le Parisien, a powerful daily, is to be sold for around €120m (the family owners wanted €200m). Last year, it made about €240m in revenue and lost €6 m. Together, Le Parisien, and its national/regional edition, Aujourd’hui en France, have a combined circulation of 477,579 and a readership of 2.23m (that is an astonishing 4.7 readers per copy). Translated into an ARPU (Average revenue per User) equivalent, Le Parisien makes 496€ per buyer of the paper per year, and €106 per reader per year. Let’s keep those numbers in mind.

According to the Schibsted press release, Le Bon Coin is valued at 22 times 2009 revenue of €18m, and 11 times the 2010 expected revenue of €36m.

On the one hand, we have a great but money-losing news media brand, Le Parisien, likely to be sold for 0.5 or 0.6 times its revenue. And, on the other, a classifieds website, Le Bon Coin, valued 11 times its revenue.

Isn’t there an imbalance here? An excess of sorts?

Asset performance provides parts of the answer: strings of losses for the newspaper (although clearly getting better) against a whopping 59% EBITDA for the classifieds sites and its ultralight production structure (20 people).

But the real answer is elsewhere: expected growth. More

Learning from free Classifieds

What can we learn from classifieds web sites? Are there some features, strategies that could apply to online news media? On Google.fr, one of the most searched terms is “Le bon coin” (the good spot). (1Leboncoin.fr, is a free classifieds site that ranks n°7 on the French market. It generates stunning monthly numbers:

  • 4bn page views (a big news site makes between 100-300m pages views)
  • 9.4m unique visitors
  • 1:10 hour spent per visitor (vs. 16-20 minutes for online newspapers)
  • 38 pages views per visitor
  • for each visit, a viewer will look at 37 pages, and will stay 16 minutes on the site
  • every single day, 300,000 new classifieds are posted by 200,000 users
  • in a single month, more than 2m people will place a classified ad.
  • the site carries an inventory of 9.5m classifieds (vs. 0.8m for ebay.fr).

All of this has been achieved in three years and by a team of 15. Leboncoin is part of a European strategy developed by the Norwegian media group Schibsted ASA: it started with Blocket in Sweden, and expanded to Segundamano in Spain, Subito in Italy, and more recently Custo Justo in Portugal. In France, Leboncoin is a co-owned with Spir Communication (2).

After a careful look at this business and lengthy discussions with Leboncoin’s general manager’s Olivier Aizac, here are some ideas worth considering for news sites. More