iOS8

Three Years Later: Tim Cook’s Apple

 

On September 9th, Apple will announce products likely to be seen as a new milestone in Tim Cook’s tenure as Apple’s CEO.

You Break It You Own It. This Labor Day weekend sits about midway between two  anniversaries: Tim Cook assumed the CEO mantel a little over three years ago – and Steve Jobs left this world – too soon – early October 2011. And, in a few days, Apple will announce new products, part of a portfolio that caused one of Cook’s lieutenants, Eddy Cue, to gush Apple had the “best product lineup in 25 Years”. Uttered at last Spring’s Code Conference, Cue’s saeta was so unusual it briefly disoriented Walt Mossberg, a seasoned interviewer if there ever was one. After a brief pause, Walt slowly asked Apple’s exec to repeat. Cue obliged with a big I Ate The Canary smile – and raised expectations that will soon meet reality.

After three years at the helm, we’ll soon know in what sense Tim Cook “owns” Apple. For having broken Steve’s creation, for having created a field of debris littered with occasionally recognizable remains of a glorious, more innovative, more elegant past. Or for having followed the spirit of Steve’s dictum – not to think of what he would have done – and led Apple to new heights.

For the past three years, detractors have relentlessly criticized Cook for not being Steve Jobs, for failing to bring out the Next Big Thing, for lacking innovation.
Too often, clickbaiters and other media mountebanks veered into angry absurdity. One recommended Cook buy a blazer to save his job; another told us he a direct line to Apple’s Board and knew directors were demanding more innovation from their CEO; and, last Spring, a Valley bloviator commanded Apple to bring out a smartwatch within 60 days – or else! (No links for these clowns.)

More measurably, critics pointed to slower revenue growth: + 9% in 2013 vs + 65% in 2011 and + 52% in 2010, the last two “Jobs Years”. Or the recent decrease in iPad sales: – 9% in the June 2014 quarter – a never-seen-before phenomenon for Apple products (I exclude the iPod, now turning into an ingredient of iPhones and iPads).

Through all this, Apple’s CEO never took the bait and, unlike Jobs, either ignored jibes, calmly exposed his counterpoint, or even apologized when warranted by the Maps fiasco. One known – and encouraging – exception to his extremely controlled public manner took place when he told a representative of a self-described conservative think-tank what to do with his demand “to commit right then and there to doing only those things that were profitable” [emphasis mine]:

“When we work on making our devices accessible by the blind, […] I don’t consider the bloody ROI.”
and…
“If you want me to do things only for ROI reasons, you should get out of this stock.”

Not everything that counts can be counted and… you know the rest of the proverb. Apple shareholders (not to be confused with pump-and-dump traders) at large seem to agree.

The not-taken road to perdition hasn’t been a road to perfection either. Skipping over normal, unavoidable irritants and bugs – the smell of sausage factories is still with me –

a look at Apple’s Mail client makes one wish for stronger actions than bug fixes leading to new crashes. This is a product, or people, that need stronger decision as they do not represent Apple at its best. Another long-time offender is the iTunes client. One unnamed Apple friend calls it “our Vista” and explains it might suffer from its laudable origin as a cross-platform Mac/Windows application, a feature vital to iPod’s success – we’ll recall its 2006 revenue ($7.7B, + 69% year-to-year growth!) was higher than the Mac’s ($7.4B, + 18%).

Now looking forward, we see this:

Apple Flint Center Barge

A large, cocooned structure being built by an “anonymous” company, next to Cupertino’s aptly named Flint Center for the Performing Arts, where Apple will unveil its next products this coming September 9th. Someone joked this was yet another instance of Apple’s shameless imitation of Google’s innovations. This time Apple copied Google’s barges, but could even get its own clone to float.

Seriously, this is good news. This is likely to be a demo house, one in which to give HomeKit, HealthKit or, who knows, payment systems demonstrations, features of the coming iOS 8 release for “communicating with and controlling connected accessories”. The size of the structure speaks for Apple’s ambitions.

On other good news, we hear Apple’s entry into “wearables”, or into the “smartwatch” field won’t see any shipments until 2015. The surprise here is that Apple would show or tease the product on 9/9. There have been exactly zero leaks of body parts, circuit boards, packages and other accessories, leading more compos mentis observers (not to be confused with compost mentis on Fox News) to think a near term announcement wasn’t in the cards. But John Paczkowski, a prudent ans well-informed re/code writer assures us Apple will indeed announce a “wearable” — only to tell us, two days later, it won’t ship until next year. The positive interpretation is this: Apple’s new wearable category isn’t just a thing, an gizmo, you can throw into the channel and get the money pump running – at nice but immaterial accessory rates. Rather, Apple’s newer creation is a function-rich device that needs commitment, software and partnerships, to make a material difference. For this it needs time. Hence the painful but healthy period of frustration. (Electronic Blue Balls, in the immortal words of Regis McKenna, the Grand Master of Silicon Valley Marketing, who was usually critical of firms making an exciting product announcement, only to delay customer gratification for months.)

The topic of payments is likely to be a little less frustrating – but could mead to another gusher of media commentary. Whether Apple partners with Visa, American Express or others is still a matter of speculation. But one thing is clear: this idea isn’t for Apple to displace or disintermediate any of the existing players. Visa, for example, will still police transactions. And Apple isn’t out to make any significant amount of money from payments.

The goal, as always, is to make Apple devices more helpful, pleasurable – and to sell more of these at higher margins as a result. Like HomeKit or HealthKit, it’s an ecosystem play.

There’s also the less surprising matter of new iPhones. I don’t know if there will be a 4.7” model, or a 5.5” model or both. To form the beginning of an opinion, I went to the Palo Alto Verizon store on University Avenue and asked to buy the 5” Lumia Icon Windows Phone on display. The sales person only expressed polite doubt and excused himself “to the back” to get one. It took eight minutes. The rest of the transaction was quick and I walked out of the store $143.74 lighter. I wanted to know how a larger phone would feel on a daily, jeans and jacket breast-pocket experience. It’s a little heavy (167 grams, about 50 grams more than an iPhone 5S), with a very nice, luminous screen and great Segoe WP system font:

Icon Lumia

I won’t review the phone or Windows Phone here. Others have said everything that needs to be said on the matter. It’s going to be a tough road for Microsoft to actually become a weighty number three in the smartphone race.

But mission accomplished: It feels like a larger iPhone, perhaps a tad lighter than the Lumia will deliver a pleasant experience. True, the one-handed use will probably be restricted to a subset of the (mostly male) population. And today’s 4” screen size will continue to be available.

There remains the question of what size exactly: 4.7”, or 5.5” (truly big), or both. For this I’ll leave readers in John Gruber’s capable hands. In a blog post titled Conjecture Regarding Larger iPhone Displays, John carefully computes possible pixel densities for both sizes and offers an clarifying discussion of “points”, an important iOS User Interface definition.

We’ll know soon.

As usual, the small matter of implementation remains. There are sure to be the usual hiccups to be corrected in .1 or .2 update in iOS 8. And there won’t be any dearth of bilious comments about prices and other entries on the well-worn list of Apple sins.

But I’ll be surprised if the public perception of Tim Cook’s Apple doesn’t take yet another turn for the better.

JLG@mondaynote.com

 

WWDC: iOS 2.0, the End of Silos

 

Apple tears down the walls between iOS applications, developer rejoice, and Tim Cook delivers a swift kick to Yukari Iwatani Kane’s derrière – more on that at the end.

In this year’s installment of the World Wide Developers Conference, Apple announced a deluge of improvements to their development platforms and tools, including new SDKs (CloudKit, HomeKit, HealthKit); iCloud Drive, the long awaited response to Dropbox; and Swift, an easy-to-learn, leak-free programming language that could spawn a new generation of Apple developers who regard Objective-C as esoteric and burdensome.

If this sounds overly geeky, let’s remind ourselves that WWDC isn’t intended for buyers of Apple products. It’s a sanctuary for people who write OS X and iOS applications. This explains Phil Schiller’s absence from the stage: Techies don’t trust marketing people. (Unfortunately, the conference’s ground rules seem to have been lost on some of the kommentariat.)

The opening keynote is a few breaths short of 2 hours. If you’d rather not drink from the proverbial fire hydrant, you can turn to summaries from Federico Viticci in MacStories, Andrew Cunningham in Ars Technica (“Huge for developers. Massive for everyone else.”), or you can look for reviews, videos, and commentary through Apple’s new favorite search engine, DuckDuckGo, “The search engine that doesn’t track you”.

For today, I’ll focus on the most important WWDC announcement: iOS applications have been freed from the rigid silos, the walls that have prevented them from talking to each other. Apple developers can now write extensions to their apps and avail themselves of the interprocess facilities that they expect from a 21st century OS.

A bit of history will help.

When the first iPhone is shipped in late June, 2007, iOS is incomplete in many respects. There’s no cut and paste, no accented characters, and, most important, there are no native apps. Developers must obey Steve Job’s dictate to extend the iPhone through slow and limited Web 2.0 apps. In my unofficial version numbering, I call this iOS 0.8.

The Web 2.0 religion doesn’t last long. An iOS Software Development Kit (SDK) is announced in the fall and released in February, 2008. When the iTunes-powered App Store opens its doors in July, the virtual shelves are (thinly) stocked with native apps. This is iOS 1.0.

Apple developers enthusiastically embrace the platform and the App Store starts it dizzying climb from an initial 500 apps in 2008 to today’s 1.2 million apps and 75B cumulated downloads.

However, developers’ affections don’t extend to Apple’s “security state”, the limits imposed on their apps in the name of security and simplicity. To be sold in the App Store, an app must agree to stay confined in its own little sandbox, with no way to communicate with other apps.

According to Apple dogma, this limitation is a good thing because it prevents the viruses and other malware that have plagued older operating systems and overly-trusting apps. One wrong click and your device is visited by rogue code that wreaks havoc on your data, yields control to remote computers, or, worst of all, sits silently and unnoticed while it spies on your keystrokes. No such thing on iOS devices. The prohibition against inter-application exchange vastly reduces the malware risk.

This protection comes with a cost. For example, when you use a word processor or presentation tool on a personal computer, you can grab text and images of any provenance and drop them into your project. On the iOS version of Pages, you can only see other Pages documents — everything else is out of sight and out of reach.

The situation becomes even more galling when developers notice that some of Apple’s in-house apps — iMessage, Maps, Calendar with Contacts — are allowed to talk among themselves. To put it a little too simply, Apple engineers can write code that’s forbidden to third party developers.

Apple’s rules for app development and look-and-feel are famously (and frustratingly) rigid, but the company is occasionally willing to shed its dogma. In 2013, for example, skeuomorphism was abandoned…do any of us miss the simulated leather and torn bits of paper on the calendar?

With last week’s unveiling of the new version of iOS, a much more important dogma has been tossed into the dustbin: An app can now reach beyond its sandbox. Apps can interconnect, workflows are simplified, previously unthinkable feats are made possible.

This is the real iOS 2.0. For developers, after the 2008 momentous opening of the App Store that redefined the smartphone, this is the second major release.

With the new iOS, a third-party word processor developer can release his app from its sandbox by simply incorporating the Document Picker:

“The document picker feature lets users select documents from outside your app’s sandbox. This includes documents stored in another app’s iCloud container or documents provided by a third-party extension.”

Users of the word processor will be able to see and incorporate all files, regardless of how they were created or where they’re stored (within the obvious physical limits). This is a welcome change from today’s frustratingly constricted situation.

iOS Extensions, a feature that lets applications offer their own services to other apps, played well when demonstrated by Craig Federighi, Senior VP of Apple Software:

“Federighi was able to easily modify Safari by adding a sharing option for Pinterest and a translation tool courtesy of Bing. Users will also be able to apply photo filters from third-party apps and use document providers like Box or OneDrive…”
Business Insider, Why You Should Be Excited for Extensions in iOS 8 

Prominent among the benefactors of iOS Extensions are third-party keyboard designers. Today, I watch with envy as my Droid compatriots Swype a quick text message. The keyboard layouts and input methods on my iPhone are limited to the choices Apple gives me — and they don’t include Swype. Tomorrow, developers will be able to augment Apple’s offerings, including keyboards that are designed for specific apps.

As expected, developers have reacted enthusiastically to the end of silo hell. Phil Libin, Evernote’s CEO, sums up developer sentiment in the Ars Technica review:

“We’re most excited about extensions, widgets, TouchID APIs and interactive notifications. We’re all over all of that…This is a huge update for us. It feels like we got four out of our top five most wanted requests!”

Now, for the mandatory “To Be Sure” paragraph…

None of this is free. I don’t mean in the financial sense, but in terms of complexity, restrictions, adapting to new ways of doing old things as well as to entirely fresh approaches. While the relaxation of Apple’s “security state” strictures opens many avenues, it also heightens malware risk, something Apple is keenly aware of. In some cases the company will put the onus on the user, asking us to explicitly authorize the use of an extension. In other situations, as Charles Arthur points out in his WWDC article for The Guardian, Apple will put security restrictions on custom keyboards. Quoting Apple’s prerelease documentation:

“There are certain text input objects that your custom keyboard is not eligible to type into. First is any secure text input object [which is] distinguished by presenting typed characters as dots.
When a user taps in a secure text input object, the system temporarily replaces your custom keyboard with the system keyboard. When the user then taps in a nonsecure text input object, your keyboard automatically resumes.”

In part, the price to pay for the new freedoms will depend on Apple’s skills in building safeguards inside the operating system — that’s what all OS strive for. Developers will also have to navigate a new labyrinth of guidelines to avoid triggering the App Store security tripwire.

That said, there is little doubt that the fall 2014 edition of iOS will be well received for both existing and new iDevices. Considering what Apple iOS developers were able to accomplish while adhering to the old dogma, we can expect more than simply more of the same when the new version of iOS is released.

Which brings us to Tim Cook and the stamp he’s put on Apple. Critics who moan that Apple won’t be the same now that Steve Jobs is gone forget the great man’s parting gift: “Don’t try to guess what I would have done. Do what you think its best.” With the Maps fiasco, we saw Cook take the message to heart. In a break with the past, Cook apologized for an Apple product without resorting to lawyerly caveats and justifications. In a real break with the past, he even recommended competing products.

We’ve also seen Cook do what he thinks is best in his changes to the executive team that he inherited from Jobs. Craig Federighi replaces 20-year NeXT/Apple veteran Scott Forstall; Angela Ahrendts is the new head of Retail; there’s a new CFO, Luca Maestri, and a new head of US Sales, Doug Beck. The transitions haven’t always been smooth — both Ahrendts’ and Beck’s immediate predecessors were Cook appointees who didn’t work out and were quickly dismissed. (Beck was preceded by Zane Browe, former CFO at United Airlines…a CFO in a Sales job?)

Inside the company, Cook is liked and respected. He’s seen as calmly demanding yet fair; he guides and is well supported by his Leadership Team. This isn’t what the PR office says, it’s what I hear from French friends who work there. More than just French, they’re hard-to-please Parisians…

I Love Rien I'm Parisien

…but they like Cook, the way he runs the show. (True to their nature, they save a few barbs for the egregious idiots in their midst.)

With this overall picture of corporate cultural health and WWDC success in mind, let’s turn to Yukari Iwatani Kane, the author of Haunted Empire, Apple After Steve Jobs.

On her Web page, Kane insists her book, exemplar of the doomed-without-Jobs attitude, is “hard-hitting yet fair”. That isn’t what most reviewers have to say. The Guardian’s Charles Arthur called it “great title, shame about the contents”; Time’s Harry McCracken saw it as “A Bad Book About Apple After Steve Jobs”; Jason Snell’s detailed review in Macworld neatly addresses the shortcoming that ultimately diminishes the book’s value:

“Apple after the death of Steve Jobs would be a fascinating topic for a book. This isn’t the book. Haunted Empire can’t get out of the way of its own Apple-is-doomed narrative to tell that story.”

Having read the book, I can respect the research and legwork this professional writer, previously at the Wall Street Journal, has put into her opus, but it’s impossible to avoid the feeling that Kane started with a thesis and then built an edifice on that foundation despite the incompatible facts. Even now she churlishly sticks to her negative narrative: Where last week’s successful WWDC felt like a confederation of engineers and application developers happily working together, Kane sees them as caretakers holding a vigil:

Kane Churlish Tweet 450

The reaction to Kane’s tweet was “hard-hitting yet fair”:

Responses to Kane 450

Almost three years after Tim Cook took the helm, the company looks hale, not haunted.

I’ll give Cook the last word. His assessment of Kale’s book:  “nonsense”.

JLG@mondaynote.com